Donald Trump’s visit to UK: US president appears to question Theresa May’s Brexit strategy

Day-by-day: The US president’s itinerary in Britain

Donald Trump has a busy few days ahead of him as he arrives for his first visit to the UK as president. Here is a look at his itinerary.

Thursday
  • Mr Trump will arrive into Stansted airport on Thursday at around lunchtime, fresh from the Nato summit in Brussels.
  • Mr Trump and First Lady Melania will have a meet and greet at the US Embassy in London.
  • The US president cancelled a planned visit to open the newly relocated embassy at the beginning of the year, saying the move from Grosvenor Square in the prestigious Mayfair district of central London to an what he described as an “off location” at Nine Elms, south of the Thames, was a “bad deal”.
  • The couple will attend a black-tie dinner at the Grade I-listed Blenheim Palace in Oxfordshire hosted by Theresa May.
  • Other guests are set to include leaders from business sectors, celebrating the business links between the UK and US.
  • The menu for the dinner at Blenheim Palace includes Scottish salmon, English Hereford beef filet and vegetables, and strawberries and clotted cream ice cream.
  • Mr Trump and his wife will spend Thursday night at Winfield House in Regent’s Park, which is the US Ambassador’s residence in London.
Friday
  • Mr Trump will meet again with Mrs May for a visit to a defence site. Air restrictions have been put in place above the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.
  • The pair will then travel to Chequers, the Prime Minister’s country residence, for what is being billed as “substantive bilateral talks on a range of foreign policy issues” during a working lunch.
  • The menu for the working lunch will consist of Dover sole, Chiltern lamb and vegetables, and lemon meringue pie.
  • A press conference is pencilled in for afterwards.
  • Mr Trump will meet the Queen at Windsor Castle.
  • The Queen and Mr Trump will inspect the Guard of Honour before watching the military march past.
  • Mr and Mrs Trump will also join the Queen for tea at the Castle.
  • Later in the evening Mr Trump will head to Scotland for the weekend. He will be welcomed by David Mundell, the Secretary of State for Scotland.
Saturday
  • Mr Trump is believed to be spending the weekend playing golf at his Turnberry resort in South Ayrshire, which he bought in 2014, although there has been no official confirmation of his plans.
  • Mr Trump’s mother, the late Mary MacLeod Trump, was Scottish. She was born on the Isle of Lewis before emigrating to the US in the 1930s.
Sunday
  • President Trump and the First Lady are expected to depart.

Helicopters, a motorcade and the nuclear ‘football’: Trump’s presidential entourage

Donald Trump will be accompanied by as many as 1,000 staff, a motorcade and multiple helicopters during his UK trip.

Here is what the presidential entourage is made up of:

Air Force One

The US leader will emerge from Air Force One – one of two specially modified Boeing 747-200s.

The luxurious aircraft, carrying the tail codes 28000 and 29000, are highly customised and can act as a mobile command centre in the event of an attack on the United States.

The words “United States of America”, the Seal of the President of the United States and the American flag are all visible on the outside of the plane, making it instantly recognisable.

The aircraft has 4,000 square feet of floor space, including a Presidential suite with a large office and conference room, a medical suite that can be used as an operating room and two food preparation galleys that can feed 100 people at a time.

Overseas trips see additional staff and security flown over on an Air Force C-32, which is a modified Boeing 757.

The Beast

The presidential motorcade, which includes two identical limousines, nicknamed The Beast, and other security and communications vehicles, is brought across by Air Force transport aircraft.

The Beast is a seven-seat black armoured limousine which reportedly costs two million US dollars (£1.5 million) and is designed to give Mr Trump the ultimate protection.

It can be turned into a sealed panic room with oxygen tanks, night-vision camera and reinforced steel plating said to be able to resist bullets, chemical attacks and bombs.

The Cadillac has Kevlar-reinforced tyres and steel rims that can keep the vehicle moving even if the tyres have been destroyed.

Bottles of the president’s blood type are carried on board in case of a medical emergency, and a satellite phone enables communication to be maintained from anywhere in the world.

As well as being able to defend the president, the car also features a host of attacking capabilities, such as a pump-action shotgun and a tear gas cannon.

Marine One

A number of presidential helicopters, either VH-3D Sea Kings or VH-60N White Hawks – which are known as Marine One when the president is on board – are also brought on overseas trips.

The Marine One helicopter is fitted with communications equipment, anti-missile defences and hardened hulls.

Staff and security personnel are ferried around in MV-22 Ospreys and CH-46s.

Staff

Staff typically involved in an overseas trip include Secret Service post-standers, military communications specialists and White House aides.

The president has at his side at all times a White House doctor and one of five rotating military aides who carry the nuclear “football” – equipped with communication tools and a book with prepared war plans.

There is always a group of 13 members of the press on such visits, including three wire reporters, two print reporters, four photographers, a three-person television crew, and a radio reporter.

Germany ‘controlled’ by Russian energy, says Trump

The US president used the Nato summit to launch fierce attack on Germany, saying it was “totally controlled” by Russia, as he ratcheted up demands for Nato allies to pay more for their collective defence.

Mr Trump accused Angela Merkel’s country of being “captive” to Russia because of its joint energy deals, including a proposed new gas pipeline.

He questioned why America was spending billions of dollars countering the Kremlin through Nato while European countries handed similar amounts to Russia in business deals.

Mr Trump also suggested that Nato’s 29 members should spend four per cent of their GDP on defence, double the two per cent target that all but a handful of countries already fail to meet.

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